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Cheap NFL Jerseys From China | Wholesale NFL Jerseys To US

Cheap Miami Dolphins Jersey Wholesale From China For Sale

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Miami Dolphins

Miami Dolphins

Seeing Jon Gruden back in the NFL, a major coup for the Oakland Raiders, has me wondering again.

What is the surest solution for any team looking to shake off the doldrums and make a serious run at the Super Bowl? And, to go along with that, why didn’t it work for the Miami Dolphins when they got their last splashy hire, Nick Saban?

Wayne Huizenga left the league when he couldn’t come up for answers to those questions. He’s the former Dolphins owner who made the huge headline hires of Jimmy Johnson and Saban at different times, and who had Dan Marino as his quarterback for a decade, but still never broke through to the top.

Huizenga was trying to buy a little magic, just as the Raiders are now with their $100 million investment in Gruden. Remember, Oakland is where Gruden started his head coaching career, but the late Al Davis tired of him after a couple of brief postseason appearances and let his popular young coach leave for Tampa Bay.

So what happened? Magic, more or less. A Super Bowl title in his first season there. A flash of charisma, too, that had you thinking dynasty.

A solid roster already in place surely helped. The Bucs had made the playoffs in four of the previous five seasons under Tony Dungy, who got the boot despite an overall regular-season record of 54-42. Right off the bat, Gruden could depend on Pro Bowl defenders like Warren Sapp and John Lynch and Derrick Brooks, who combined to make Tampa Bay No. 1 in fewest points and yards allowed.

There was, however, no elite quarterback. Gruden used Brad Johnson for most of that Super Bowl season, and turned to Rob Johnson and Shaun King for three emergency starts when injuries struck.

There was no immediate promise of help from the NFL draft, either. Tampa Bay traded its first- and second-round picks to Oakland for the rights to sign Gruden away.

Altogether, it seems that Gruden grabbed hold of some very rare lightning in his debut season with the Bucs, because he was only 45-51 after that, with a couple of wild-card playoff losses.

Clearly, this gig is harder than Bill Belichick makes it look. That’s why, in retrospect, it would have been astounding for Saban to thrive immediately with the Dolphins, and why it’s disappointing that he didn’t stick around to see what would happen when a few more things came his way.

No fewer than 11 coaches who already had Super Bowl titles or would eventually win one were working in the league when Saban showed up. All of them had figured out as much as anyone can about succeeding in the NFL, yet two of them – Gruden and three-time Super Bowl champion Joe Gibbs – could do more than match Saban’s 15-17 record in the seasons of 2005 and 2006.

Bill Parcells was 18-14 with Dallas over that same stretch. Bill Cowher was 19-13 with a Super Bowl title during those two years. Tom Coughlin and Brian Billick were 19-13 and failed between them to win a single playoff game.

Trying to be smarter than every other coach is not a viable long-term strategy in this league, unless you’re Belichick and Tom Brady, and having a great organization merely gives you a chance.

Look at Saban’s staff in 2005. His defensive line coach was Dan Quinn, who nearly won the Super Bowl last year as Atlanta’s head coach and has the Falcons on another title hunt this month. Two other future NFL head coaches – Jason Garrett and Scott Linehan – worked assistant jobs on offense. And no matter what anybody thinks of Will Muschamp, the Dolphins’ defensive coordinator in 2005, he and South Carolina just got a bowl victory over Jim Harbaugh, the savant of Ann Arbor and a former NFL head coach himself.

If there are lessons in all of this for Adam Gase, and for those who believe him to be suddenly in over his head, it’s that the NFL makes every coach look confused from time to time, especially those, like Saban, who didn’t have a top quarterback. Makes some very accomplished coaches decide to stay out altogether, too, men like Bobby Bowden and Bear Bryant and Joe Paterno and Tom Osborne.

So it’s good luck to Gruden and the Raiders. He’s a good coach but they have no guarantee of a brilliant relationship, even with glitzy Las Vegas in their future.

That’s because the Raiders are coming off a 6-10 season, just like Miami, and because there are no sure solutions for turning a mediocre team into a monster overnight. None at all.

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Cheap Tampa Bay Buccaneers Jersey From China For Free Shipping

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The Tampa Bay Buccaneers’ starting running back Monday night against the Atlanta Falcons will be Peyton Barber.

Doug Martin is inactive Monday night for an unspecified violation of team rules, the team said.

Martin has started eight of the nine games he has played in this season, but he has struggled, averaging just 3.1 yards per carry.

He was benched for the second half after he lost a fumble in the Buccaneers’ 24-21 loss to the Detroit Lions in Week 14. He finished with 10 carries for 26 yards and a touchdown. Barber had 12 carries for 58 yards in the loss.

Barber has appeared in all 13 of the Buccaneers’ games this season and is averaging 3.8 yards per carry. He got his only start this season in Week 13 against the Packers, when Martin was out with a concussion. In that game, he rushed for 102 yards on 23 carries.

Martin, a two-time Pro Bowl selection, has 402 yards on 129 carries this season. He has three rushing touchdowns.

Barber, in his second season, has 248 yards on 65 carries. He has rushed for two scores.

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Cheap Chicago Bears Jersey Wholesale From China For Sale

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With a quarter of a season left it’s fairly obvious the Bears aren’t very good. A jaw-droppingly dreadful home loss to the formerly one-win 49ers is the latest evidence of that sad fact.

Must be the coaches. What have they ever done? John Fox came here a career Super Bowl loser having failed to pull off the trick twice with two different franchises. Defensive coordinator Vic Fangio had the same position he now holds at yet a third team that lost a Super Bowl.

Castigate coaches all you like, but it is a time-honored belief that coaches can’t coach if their players can’t play. Let’s be polite and say the Bears’ talent is lacking.

How far short is it? When the Bears face the Browns on Christmas Eve at Soldier Field, four experts contacted for this story believe it will be a battle between the two worst rosters in the NFL. At least the Browns have a ton of draft picks to fall back on.

“Yeah, I think their offense is the easiest in the NFL to game plan,’’ a longtime coach admitted.

It’s a formula the Bears see every week: stop the run; make them throw; cover them man-to-man on passing downs and watch the receivers fail to separate.

The Bears defense was keeping them in games earlier in the season, but they are a shadow of their former selves with multiple injury concerns at pass rusher, inside linebacker and safety. Once upon a time the Bears also boasted a power running game before injuries and inconsistency on the line and at running back took a toll.

It has been a theme with the Bears. Injuries follow the franchise like night follows day. The team used a strategy of pretending it was all bad luck after last year’s three-win, injury-plagued season. They didn’t make aggressive, drastic changes in staff or procedure. Heck, at this point why not try a shaman or a faith healer, even a witch doctor?

From the lofty heights of a 3-4 record with victories over the Steelers, Ravens and Panthers, the Bears have been stacking losses like Lego pieces. If every setback were a springboard to greatness the Bears would be a Super Bowl contender.

Sadly, that is not how it works in the NFL. Fox and his staff will be out of work at the end of the season and kid general manager Ryan Pace will be tasked with getting a younger, more energetic, less experienced and relatively unknown replacement.

Bigger name coaches won’t want Pace picking their players — not when his Plan A keeps failing and Plan B seems incapable of working. There won’t be much faith in a guy who can’t find a player to produce a sack unless he’s claimed off waivers or runs out of safeties to the point of signing a “starter” off the street. The GM has given us a work in progress that hasn’t progressed.

The offensive line is measured via sundial, or at least plays that way, a Pro Bowl receiver was allowed to walk without replacement and the shiny new quarterback to rust unfurnished with nary a playmaker in sight.

Pace will find a coach. You can get anybody to take a job. People want a paycheck. A bigger problem will be finding assistant coaches because most of the really good ones are already under contract around the league.

Any new coach will want to turn over the roster — out with the old and in with the new. Pace can begin another rebuild in the fourth year of his tenure. Blame the bad free agent signings and uneven drafts on the coaches.

But at some point in a private moment maybe he ought to ask himself if it is the coaches or the players, or even the guy stacking the deck?

Why wait three years to draft a quarterback? Shouldn’t Jay Cutler have been released a year ago if you were going to spend more money on one year of Mike Glennon? How’s Marcus Wheaton doing? How can you run out of kickers?

The Bears would own the No. 6 pick if the season ended now despite having the same 3-9 record as the Broncos and Colts. The winless Browns would pick first, followed by the 49ers and Giants (both 2-10). The rest of those teams all have a coach or GM with fewer years on the job than the Bears with Fox and Pace.

Being further along in a rebuild seemingly would indicate the Bears would be getting better instead of worse. Maybe Pace will get it right with a different coach who has a resume as thin as his own. Shouldn’t the Bears at least have to beat the Browns before that is decided?

Mike Mulligan is a special contributor to the Chicago Tribune.

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Cheap New Orleans Saints Jersey From China For Free Shipping

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NEW ORLEANS — Alvin Kamara gave an entertaining description this week about how he goes into “Matrix mode” when he makes defenders miss all over the field.

On Sunday, he and fellow New Orleans Saints running back Mark Ingram gave a thrilling visual presentation inside the Mercedes-Benz Superdome.

The NFL’s most dynamic running back duo sideswiped, stiff-armed and sprinted past the Carolina Panthers’ defense in a 31-21 victory that has the Saints threatening to run away with the NFC South.

“We can prepare for whatever we want,” Panthers coach Ron Rivera said when asked specifically about Kamara — who now has at least one touchdown in six straight games. “But he’s got some elite ability.”

Kamara indeed looked like the main character, Neo, from those “Matrix” movies when he absorbed a hit from linebacker Shaq Thompson in front of the goal line, bent back, then snapped forward into the end zone for a 2-yard TD run on a critical fourth-down try on New Orleans’ opening drive.

Then Ingram did his best impression with a 72-yard run in the second quarter, when he made Panthers safety Mike Adams miss three times with two cutbacks and a stiff-arm.

“I’m trying to get my best ‘Alvin Kamara’ on. I’m trying to go in ‘Matrix mode,’” said Ingram, who added, “[People are] sleeping on my speed, so I gotta put the burners on ‘em every now and then.”

Kamara finished with 60 rushing yards, 66 receiving yards and two touchdown runs. Ingram finished with 85 rushing yards, 37 receiving yards and a TD.

It was the fourth time this season they have both finished with more than 100 yards from scrimmage. According to the Elias Sports Bureau, they’re the first RB duo to do that since the San Francisco 49ers’ Roger Craig and Wendell Tyler in 1985.

They both credited their blocking help, as well — including tight end Michael Hoomanawanui’s assist on Kamara’s fourth-down TD run and a huge push from center Max Unger on Ingram’s fight for a third-down conversion later in the game.

The numbers, like the runs, have become ridiculous this season. Kamara and Ingram have combined for 200-plus yards from scrimmage in five straight games. They have combined for a total of 1,872 scrimmage yards since Week 6 (234 per game). They have combined for 20 touchdowns scored since Week 3.

Kamara leads the NFL with 7.0 yards per carry this season. And he already has become just the third rookie in NFL history with more than 600 rushing yards and 600 receiving yards in a season — with four games still to play.

But the number that means most of all is 9-3. That’s where the Saints are now, sitting alone atop the NFC South standings.

The Saints lead Carolina (8-4) by just one game, but have swept the season series. And they lead the Atlanta Falcons (7-5) by two games as they prepare to face them twice in the next three weeks (Thursday night at Atlanta, then home in Week 16).

You simply cannot say enough about how much Kamara and Ingram — and the blockers paving the way for them — have meant to New Orleans this season.

The defense (led by DE Cameron Jordan and CB Ken Crawley on Sunday, among others), QB Drew Brees and receiver Michael Thomas also have been very good this year. But they’ve also shown their warts at times. Nothing has been as consistent as the Kamara-Ingram duo.

The Saints found themselves in a pretty tense situation this week — coming off of their first loss in nine games at the Los Angeles Rams; needing a win badly over Carolina to keep from falling behind in the NFC South; playing without top cornerback Marshon Lattimore, left tackle Terron Armstead and starting rookie safety Marcus Williams.

They put their fate in the hands of Kamara and Ingram once again. And they ran with it.

“That was the plan,” Ingram said. “Over the past few years, [the Panthers] have been getting the best of us, especially in big games. So we put emphasis on that we was gonna be the bullies, we was gonna execute and that was a great team win.”

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Cheap Jacksonville Jaguars Jersey Wholesale From China

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Jacksonville Jaguars

Jacksonville Jaguars

The Jacksonville Jaguars have signed rookie long snapper Colin Holba to the team’s active roster

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – The Jacksonville Jaguars have signed rookie long snapper Colin Holba to the team’s active roster, the club announced today. To make room on the roster, the Jaguars placed Matt Overton on the team’s reserve/injured list.

Holba, 6-4, 248, was originally selected in the sixth round (213th overall) of the 2017 NFL Draft by the Pittsburgh Steelers. Holba attended the University of Louisville where he served two seasons (2015-16) as the team’s primary long snapper. A native of Louisville, Holba played two years of football and three years of baseball at Eastern (Ky.) High School and served as the long snapper during his sophomore and junior seasons. Holba was released by the Steelers on Sept. 2 during roster reductions. Holba is pronounced, “HOLE-buh.”

Overton, a sixth-year veteran who was signed on Aug. 3, sustained a shoulder injury in the Jaguars’ Week 10 victory over the Los Angeles Chargers.

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Cheap Atlanta Falcons Jersey Wholesale From China

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Mohamed Sanu

Mohamed Sanu

CHARLOTTE — When All-Pro wide receiver Julio Jones dropped a wide-open 39-yard touchdown pass with just under nine minutes left in regulation Sunday, you knew what kind of day it had been for the Atlanta Falcons.

Jones’ bobble magnified another implosion for the Falcons in a 20-17 loss to the Carolina Panthers. The Falcons actually looked poised to silence the crowd at Bank of America Stadium after jumping out to a 10-0 lead after one quarter, building steam off two forced fumbles by strong safety Keanu Neal. But they’ve developed a reputation for blowing such leads.

They did it again Sunday.

“We’ve been under the same roof, the 2017 team, for eight games,” Falcons coach Dan Quinn said. “We’re going to continue to address the areas that we need to improve on.”

A game that could have served as a statement to the rest of the NFC South turned out to be the same old story. It marked the third time this season that the 4-4 Falcons blew a lead to lose a game. They led 10-7 at home against Buffalo at halftime only to lose 23-17. They jumped out to a 17-0 lead at home against Miami only to lose 20-17.

And then came Sunday.

The Falcons dropped their division opener to the Panthers after supposedly having built momentum with last week’s close road win over the New York Jets. Now it’s fair to wonder if Quinn’s team can recapture any of the swagger from last year’s Super Bowl run in time to make a playoff run — or make the playoffs, period. Upcoming games at home against the Dallas Cowboys and on the road against the Seattle Seahawks will test the Falcons’ ability to “reset” and get back on track. Regrouping really hasn’t worked too well thus far.

The Falcons’ latest failure can be traced back to a second-quarter sequence that could have given them possibly a stranglehold on an important road win. They faced second-and-2 from Carolina’s 36-yard line with 5 minutes, 54 seconds left before halftime. What followed were three consecutive running plays for 1 yard, including a failed fourth-and-1 by Devonta Freeman. It was a series of plays that had critics calling for offensive coordinator Steve Sarkisian’s head again, although the execution wasn’t there, either.

“We have to execute as players better than we did,” Ryan said. “We’ve got to be able to move the chains with three opportunities from 2 yards or less, regardless of what we’re calling — run or pass.”

Rather than driving for possibly a 17-0 lead right then, the Falcons put the Panthers in position for their first touchdown with penalties on Austin Hooper (illegal crackback) and Brian Poole (unnecessary roughness). Then, two plays after Christian McCaffrey’s 4-yard touchdown run, Ryan threw his seventh interception of the season, this one to Mike Adams on a pass he was trying to get to Hooper down the middle of the field.

“We’re going to stay aggressive, for sure,” Ryan said of the interceptions. “Felt like we have an opportunity with Hoop in front of the safety. They made a good play. That’s one of those situations, disappointing. We’ll look at the film and see how we need to be better moving forward, but we’re going stay aggressive.”

The Panthers turned the turnover into Cam Newton’s 9-yard touchdown run, and turned the tide of the game.

Some of the same issues continued to haunt the Falcons. They went 4-for-12 on third down, not to mention 0-for-3 on fourth down. They had eight penalties for 70 yards, some of them foolish defensive flags. And they couldn’t pick up a single yard when they needed it most and finished with just 53 rushing yards on 18 carries.

Although the Falcons weren’t out of it until the very end, thanks to a late Tevin Coleman 19-yard touchdown reception, they still have to learn how to finish.

“We just lost,” Freeman said. “I guess we didn’t click. We will go back to the drawing board, figure out what we need to do to win, and win.”

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