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Cheap Kansas City Chiefs Jersey Wholesale From China For Sale

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Kansas City Chiefs

Kansas City Chiefs

Chiefs running back Kareem Hunt was honored for his special season on Tuesday, as he was named the rookie of the year by the Pro Football Writers Association.

Hunt, 22, is the first Chief to win the award.

Hunt, a third-round pick out of Toledo, rushed for a league-high 1,327 yards and eight touchdowns in 272 carries this season, becoming only the second Chiefs rookie to top 1,000 yards and the first to lead the league in rushing. Hunt also caught 53 passes for 455 yards and three touchdowns. He was the NFL’s offensive rookie of the month twice (September and December).

He was also selected as the co-offensive rookie of the year along with Saints running back Alvin Kamara, a fellow third-round pick who rushed 120 times for 728 yards — a league-leading 6.1 yards per carry — and eight touchdowns. Kamara also caught 81 passes for 826 yards and five touchdowns.

Hunt was joined on the all-rookie team by Chiefs kicker Harrison Butker, who converted 38 of 42 field goals after joining the Chiefs in Week 4. Hunt was also joined on the PWFA’s All-AFC team by right tackle Mitchell Schwartz.

The PFWA is made up of accredited writers who cover the NFL and the 32 teams daily. Hunt will find out if he won The Associated Press’ rookie of the year award at the annual NFL Honors program, which will be held in Minneapolis on Feb. 3.

2017 ROOKIE OF THE YEAR: RB Kareem Hunt, Kansas City Chiefs

2017 CO-OFFENSIVE ROOKIES OF THE YEAR: RB Kareem Hunt, Kansas City Chiefs and RB Alvin Kamara, New Orleans Saints

2017 DEFENSIVE ROOKIE OF THE YEAR: CB Marshon Lattimore, New Orleans Saints

Offense

QB: Deshaun Watson, Houston Texans

RB: Kareem Hunt, Kansas City Chiefs; Alvin Kamara, New Orleans Saints

WR: Cooper Kupp, Los Angeles Rams; Juju Smith-Schuster, Pittsburgh Steelers

TE: Evan Engram, New York Giants

C: Pat Elflein, Minnesota Vikings

G: Dan Feeney, Los Angeles Chargers; Jermaine Eluemunor, Baltimore Ravens, and Ethan Pocic, Seattle Seahawks (tie)

T: Garett Bolles, Denver Broncos; Ryan Ramczyk, New Orleans Saints

Defense

DL: Derek Barnett, Philadelphia Eagles; Myles Garrett, Cleveland Browns; Carl Lawson, Cincinnati Bengals; Dalvin Tomlinson, New York Giants

LB: Jarrad Davis, Detroit Lions; Reuben Foster, San Francisco 49ers; T.J. Watt, Pittsburgh Steelers

CB: Marshon Lattimore, New Orleans Saints; Tre’Davious White, Buffalo Bills

S: Jamal Adams, New York Jets; Marcus Williams, New Orleans Saints

Special Teams

K: Harrison Butker, Kansas City Chiefs

P: Rigoberto Sanchez, Indianapolis Colts

KR: Ryan Switzer, Dallas Cowboys

PR: Jamal Agnew, Detroit Lions

ST: Budda Baker, Arizona Cardinals

PFWA NFL ROOKIES OF THE YEAR: 1966 — MLB Tommy Nobis, Atlanta Falcons; 1967-75 — no selections; 1976 — WR Sammy White, Minnesota Vikings; 1977 — RB Tony Dorsett, Dallas Cowboys; 1978 — RB Earl Campbell, Houston Oilers; 1979 — RB Ottis Anderson, St. Louis Cardinals; 1980 — RB Billy Sims, Detroit Lions; 1981 — RB George Rogers, New Orleans Saints; 1982 — RB Marcus Allen, Los Angeles Raiders; 1983 — RB Eric Dickerson, Los Angeles Rams; 1984 — WR/KR Louis Lipps, Pittsburgh Steelers; 1985 — WR Eddie Brown, Cincinnati Bengals; 1986 — RB Rueben Mayes, New Orleans Saints; 1987 — ILB Shane Conlan, Buffalo Bills; 1988 — RB John Stephens, New England Patriots; 1990 — S Mark Carrier, Chicago Bears; 1991 — OLB Mike Croel, Denver Broncos; 1992-2012 — no selections; 2013 — RB Eddie Lacy, Green Bay Packers; 2014 — WR Odell Beckham, Jr., New York Giants; 2015 — RB Todd Gurley, St. Louis Rams; 2016 — RB Ezekiel Elliott, Dallas Cowboys; 2017 — RB Kareem Hunt, Kansas City Chiefs.
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Cheap Kansas City Chiefs Jersey Wholesale From China For Outlet

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Kansas City Chiefs

Kansas City Chiefs

The first five weeks were a lot of fun, but the Chiefs just might be better off now than they were through their 5-0 stretch.

Marcus Peters just had the game of his career in the most important regular-season game of Andy Reid’s Chiefs tenure. The offense is fixed, in large part thanks to Kareem Hunt. The Kansas City Chiefs seem confident, and are firing on all cylinders. Times are good.

So where do we go from here? How optimistic can Chiefs Kingdom dare to be?

It’s not quite as bright as it was in week five, but it might be better this way.

The Chiefs showed a lot of weaknesses in their midseason meltdown, so now it feels like the Chiefs are a flawed team, masquerading as an AFC West champion-to-be and a faux-contender. But it may not be that bleak.

The Chiefs showed a lot of flaws, but they just might be better for them. The offense has been refocused and rebuilt on Kareem Hunt, Tyreek Hill and Travis Kelce. The defense has looked better in the last two weeks than it looked at any point through the first five. The offense was beaten by cover-two defenses and even meager pressure on Alex Smith, but now they’re busting zones and the offensive line and Alex Smith seem to trust each other again. The defense couldn’t get pressure on a quarterback to save their lives, now they live in the backfield.

These were all issues that would cost the Chiefs a playoff game (or even a playoff spot) if they weren’t resolved eventually. With two convincing divisional wins in the last two weeks, you can make a reasonable argument that the Chiefs are better off now than they were in week five.

Also on today’s show: lots of discussion about Marcus Peters, and Ron Parker and Darrelle Revis give Peters high praise.

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Cheap Washington Redskin Jersey Wholesale From China Sale

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Maurice Harris

Maurice Harris

Washington kicker Nick Rose made a 56-yard field goal with a little over a minute left to play to cut the Vikings’ lead to 38-30. But Rose’s onsides kick didn’t travel the required 10 yards, giving the ball to Minnesota and allowing the Vikings to kneel to run out the clock and win the game. The Redskins drop to 4-5.

Vikings kick a field goal, extend lead to 38-27

In three-plus seasons as a member of the Redskins, Vikings kicker Kai Forbath’s longest field goal was 50 yards. Now a member of the Vikings and returning to FedEx Field, Forbath drilled a 53-yarder midway through the fourth quarter that could prove to be crucial. The kick gave the Vikings a 38-27, making this a two-possession game. Kirk Cousins and Co. will have to score twice in the next seven and a half minutes to challenge Minnesota.

D.J. Swearinger’s second interception leads to Redskins touchdown as Vikings’ lead is cut to 35-27

He calls himself two spoons. Well, D.J. Swearinger now has two interceptions after snagging another pass from Case Keenum. Although he fumbled out of bounds on the return, it gave Washington’s offense the ball at the 2-yard line. Kirk Cousins scored his second rushing touchdown two plays later on a read-option play to make it a one-score game, 35-27, with 14:47 left in the fourth quarter.

And finally a mistake from Case Keenum. Now the Redskins will have to show whether they can capitalize. Keenum was enjoying a near-flawless game with a lot of good pass protection. The Redskins have zero sacks and just two quarterback hits. But then Keenum floated a pass that was destined for Redskins’ hands, and sure enough. D.J. Swearinger came down with it, his first pick since joining Washington as a free agent this offseason. Washington’s offense took the field with a bit of momentum and in need of a score to make the final quarter here competitive.

Redskins cut Vikings’ lead to 35-20

Washington kicker Nick Rose made a 21-yard field goal with 8:28 left in the third quarter after the Redskins’ drive stalled at the Vikings’ 3-yard line, bringing the score to 35-20 in favor of Minnesota.

Minnesota extends lead to 35-17 as Case Keenum throws his fourth touchdown pass

This game flipped quickly, and just two and a half minutes into the second half, the Vikings suddenly raced out to a 35-17 lead and the Redskins were left searching for answers, especially on the defensive end. The Washington defense has allowed a touchdown on five of the Vikings’ first six drives this afternoon. The latest was a 72-yard drive on just six plays to open the third quarter, capped by Case Keenum’s 7-yard touchdown pass to Jarius Wright.

Keenum is having quite the afternoon. He’s 14-of-18 passing for 250 yards and four touchdowns. His 158.3 passer rating is perfect.

Vikings lead 28-17 at halftime after Cousins interception

Kirk Cousins was intercepted by Vikings defensive back Mackensie Alexander with 1:38 left in the first half, leading to another touchdown by Minnesota and a 28-17 lead heading into halftime.

Just when it appeared the Redskins had a chance to take the lead before halftime, they now trail by two scores. Cousins threw a costly interception, a pass intended for Jamison Crowder that sailed over his hands, and Minnesota was able to double-dip with two touchdowns in the final two minutes of the first half to take a 28-17 lead.

The Vikings have had the ball for just over 11 minutes, yet they’ve gained 247 total yards. Washington’s secondary has struggled defending Minnesota wide receivers Stefon Diggs and Adam Thielen, who have 10 combined catches for 162 yards and two touchdowns.

Adam Thielen touchdown catch gives Vikings a 21-17 advantage

Minnesota engineered a six-play, 71-yard touchdown drive that took fewer than three minutes off the clock, scoring on Case Keenum’s 7-yard TD pass to Adam Thielen.

One week after turning in one of their best defensive performances of the season, this one has been pretty uneven for the Redskins. Keenum has faced little pressure, and the Washington secondary has given up some big plays. DeAngelo Hall, Josh Norman and Bashaud Breeland have all been beat soundly in coverage at some point in the opening half of play.

On this Vikings’ scoring drive, receiver Thielen beat Breeland for a 38-yard gain that put the Vikings in the red zone. Thielen hauled in a 17-yard catch on the next snap and then two plays later caught a 7-yard touchdown pass to give Minnesota a 21-17 lead.

Redskins take a 17-14 lead on Kirk Cousins’ QB sneak

Washington finished off a 13-play, 60-yard drive with a 1-yard touchdown run by Kirk Cousins on a quarterback sneak. The biggest play on a drive was a 32-yard catch and run by Jamison Crowder.

Washington’s offensive line is healthy, and it has made a significant difference on the run game, as seen on this drive. The unit was able to get some great push in the running game against a talented Vikings defensive line, which is playing without Everson Griffen, guiding Washington’s offense down the field on a 13-play drive that lasted over seven minutes.

Vikings take a 14-10 lead with Diggs touchdown

Minnesota quarterback Case Keenum connected with wide receiver Stefon Diggs for a 3-yard touchdown pass in the second quarter, giving the Vikings a 14-10 advantage.

Kirk Cousins has an impressive first quarter

The Redskins carried a 10-7 lead into the second quarter, and Kirk Cousins seems to be benefiting from the healthy offensive line in front of him. He’s making the most of his time in the pocket and is spreading the ball around effectively. Five different Washington players registered at least one catch in the opening quarter — and not a single one of them was a tight end.

Cousins’ first quarter numbers: 10-of-12 passing for 110 yards and a touchdown and a passer rating of 132.6. Cousins often finds himself looking first at his tight ends or running backs in short-yardage situations, but in the first quarter he targeted his wide receivers six times, which resulted in six receptions.

Redskins take a 10-7 lead

Washington got a field goal out of a 10-play, 52-yard drive at the end of the first quarter. The Redskins converted a fourth down play with a pass from Kirk Cousins to running back Chris Thompson. Running back Rob Kelley appeared to injure his knee on one play.

Vikings tie game at 7-7

Minnesota answered the Redskins’ scoring drive with one of its own. Latavius Murray scored on a one-yard run two plays after Case Keenum connected with Stefon Diggs for a long completion.

We haven’t seen Josh Norman get beat deep much, if at all, this season. But he got caught cheating during the first defensive possession. Diggs got about two steps on Norman during his 51-yard reception on the third play of the drive. Diggs, a Maryland product, got Minnesota down to the 2-yard line, and Murray scored two plays later. It was an uncharacteristic play for Norman, who has been the shutdown corner Washington had hoped he would be when he signed in 2016, leading to a quick response by Minnesota.

Redskins take early 7-0 lead

Maurice Harris made a spectacular one-handed diving catch for a touchdown to give Washington an early 7-0 lead. The catch capped off a seven-play, 75-yard drive that took just over four minutes.

Minnesota cornerback Trae Waynes is going to watch film of Harris’s 36-yard reception and shake his head. There’s not much he could’ve done to prevent that one. Harris came up with a highlight-reel, diving one-handed grab as he tumbled inside the pylon for the Redskins’ first score of the game. The catch was initially ruled incomplete, but after a review, it was clear that Harris successfully made the grab inbounds. Harris was promoted to the active roster just one day earlier, and has given the Washington offense plenty of momentum out of the gate.

Reunited and it feels so good

Actually, given the injuries they’ll play through, it probably is going to hurt a bit for the Washington Redskins’ offensive line. The toughness of that unit will be on full display Sunday as the entire starting unit will suit up for the first time since Washington’s Week 7 game against Philadelphia. Since that game every member of the starting unit has missed some amount of game time, whether it was just a few plays, in the case of right tackle Morgan Moses, or several games, as is the case for Trent Williams.

Despite a right-knee injury that will require surgery to correct, Williams is suiting up and will play Sunday vs. the Vikings, joining Shawn Lauvao (who missed time with a stinger), Brandon Scherff (knee) and Moses (ankles) in the trenches. Chase Roullier is starting at center for the injured Spencer Long (knee), who is active.

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Cheap Washington Redskin Jersey From China Free Shipping

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Trent Williams

Trent Williams

How quickly a season can change. Just two days ago, the Washington Redskins had a chance to be serious contenders in the NFC East. Now, they’re wondering how many players are physically capable of playing on Sunday.

Seven players suffered injuries in the loss to the Philadelphia Eagles. On a short week against the Dallas Cowboys, Redskins Coach Jay Gruden opted to have just a closed walk-through Wednesday before holding the team’s first practice of the week Thursday.

It’s a depth chart that has been tested often over the last few weeks, and after being bested by the Eagles for a second time, the Redskins’ fortunes have dimmed. Barring a collapse by the Eagles, who have looked like the best team in the league through seven weeks, it will be a daunting task for the Redskins to win the division. Philadelphia is up 2 1/2 games on Washington heading into Week 8, and it also carries an important head-to-head tiebreaker by completing the regular season sweep.

Safe to say there’s plenty to discuss in the mailbag. As a reminder, we switched up the mailbag format from email to Twitter (welcome to 2017). Thanks for tweeting your questions using the #RedskinsWP hashtag.

The Eagles (6-1) are playing so well right now that it’s not even worth looking at the NFC East standings unless they just have a massive collapse. Looking at their schedule though, which includes a home game against the winless San Francisco 49ers on Sunday and a Week 10 bye week, it’s tough to see that happening. The wild card is still very much in play with how bunched up the NFC is with 10 weeks left, though. The Redskins (3-3) are one of eight teams currently at 3-4, 3-3 or 4-3, so the landscape suggests it would be foolish to write them off in October.

However, their roster is in bad shape this week. Four starters along the offensive line, and six of the nine on the active roster, are dealing with injuries. Five defensive backs are hurt. These two spots are very concerning during a portion of the schedule that appeared difficult even without the injuries. Washington is currently 1-1 during the second quarter of the schedule, with a Week 6 victory over the San Francisco 49ers. Its next two games come against the Dallas Cowboys (3-3) and the Seattle Seahawks (4-2).

If the Redskins can somehow walk away with a split, I think that would be the best-case scenario. That’d put them at 4-4 overall, and 3-3 in the conference, with eight games left. But that’s going to be a tough task. While it’s a home game, Washington faces a division rival on a short week coming off a Monday night. The following week, it travels to the opposite coast to play in one of the toughest environments in the NFL. The Redskins will need a lot to bounce their way to pull off a split. We’ll see how mentally tough this team is during this stretch.

The hope is that Washington’s backup offensive tackle will return next week against the Seattle Seahawks. Multiple people say he still could use about two more practice weeks to continue rehabbing a core muscle injury that required surgery following the team’s Week 3 victory over the Oakland Raiders. Gruden said at the time of the injury it would take three to six weeks for Nsekhe to recover. While Washington wishes he would return sooner, it appears that it will indeed take six weeks.

Nsekhe’s injury, which occurred while he filled in for Shawn Lauvao for a snap after Lauvao’s facemask detached from his helmet, came at a bad time for Washington. Left tackle Trent Williams has played through a right knee injury he suffered the following week and will eventually require surgery. He was replaced by backup T.J. Clemmings near the end of the game, and Williams said he may consider resting because it’s not allowing him to move like he wants to.

On top of all this, right tackle Morgan Moses sprained both of his ankles against the Eagles. Along with injuries to right guard Brandon Scherff (back/knee) and center Spencer Long (knee/quad tendinitis), the Redskins’ offensive line is in bad shape.

While the Redskins could sign tackle Vinston Painter, who was on the 90-man roster this summer and the team’s active roster last year, off the Cardinals’ practice squad for depth, Painter would need to be on the active roster for three weeks. If Nsekhe returns next week, it wouldn’t be ideal to have a roster spot dedicated to an extra tackle considering the injuries at other positions. The two most logical options seem to be either keep playing Williams until Nsekhe returns, and run the risk of doing more damage to his knee, or insert Clemmings against a Cowboys defense with 21 sacks (tied for sixth in the NFL). Yikes.

I don’t think those two things are correlated. Washington has tried to use its depth to create different looks. Jonathan Allen went on injured reserve with a foot injury, but he was part of a rotation defensive line coach Jim Tomsula implemented to keep those guys fresh. Outside linebacker Preston Smith hurt his groin, but he’s also rotated at the position.

Deshazor Everett has missed two games with a hamstring injury, but he was splitting time with Montae Nicholson at strong safety. Nicholson keeps hurting his shoulder but plays through the injury. I think his recurring injury can be chalked up to his style of play. Cornerback Fabian Moreau (hamstring) and safety Stefan McClure (hamstring) have almost exclusively played on special teams.

The injuries to Josh Norman (rib), Bashaud Breeland (knee) and Mason Foster (shoulder)? You just gotta charge those to the game.

I would expect more two- and three-tight end sets moving forward, yes. Jordan Reed is getting healthier, as evident by his two-touchdown performance against the Eagles, and Vernon Davis has been a reliable target for Kirk Cousins this season. Niles Paul even had a nice 32-yard reception. Gruden wanted to incorporate more two-tight end looks in the second half, but the game shifted from a 10-3 lead to a seven-point deficit during the final four minutes of the first half.

At the moment, the Redskins have Doctson starting at the “X” spot and Pryor serving as the backup. Jamison Crowder, who has been a slot receiver, moved over as the starting “Z” receiver with Grant. Washington needs receivers that can do the dirty work underneath at the “Z” spot, a role Pierre Garcon did very well during his tenure in DC. Crowder is a technically sound receiver that’s getting healthier after dealing with a hamstring injury during training camp and a hip issue in Week 4 against the Kansas City Chiefs.

When incorporating three wide receivers, look for Washington to go with Doctson, Crowder and Grant moving forward. That’s not to say Pryor has been ousted. He’s still expected to have a role offensively, receiving around 20-30 snaps (he received 30 against the Eagles). Pryor just won’t be heavily used as he was against the 49ers, when he played 61 snaps, because the Redskins want to see more of what Doctson, a 2016 first round pick, can bring and they’ve been productive with two and three tight ends. There’s a chance we could see plays sprinkled in with both Doctson and Pryor on the field, but Crowder is better suited at the “Z” moving forward.

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